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Living and Breathing in a ‘Black Swan’ World

Living and Breathing in a ‘Black Swan’ World

Steps to improving resilience.

By David W. Orr

A Marine Corps friend of mine defines resilience as the ability to take a gut punch and come back swinging. More formally, it is said to be the capacity to maintain core functions and values in the face of outside disturbance. Either way, the concept is elusive, a matter of more or less, not either/or. The combination of slow, cumulative changes like soil erosion, loss of species and acidification of oceans with fast, "black swan"* events, such as the Fukushima disaster, like intersecting ocean currents, will create overlapping levels of unpredictable turbulence at various depths.

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Dialogue for De-Escalation

Dialogue for De-Escalation

What good can come from the tragedy of James Barker's death?

By Jonathan G. Jemming

On January 8, 2015, James Barker, upon request of his partner Heidi, took advantage of a beautiful winter day in Salt Lake City to remove ice that had accumulated on the shady side of their Avenues home. James proceeded down the street to see if neighbors wanted their ice and remaining snow removed, either that day or in the future. James was well known for taking odd jobs either as a volunteer, a musician, an artist or even as a handyman and builder to help supplement his income.

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Is 3D Printing All About the Tchotckes?

Is 3D Printing All About the Tchotckes?

Changing the world as we know it—and Utah’s Zeni Kinetic is in the forefront.

By Alice Toler

I've been following the development of 3D printing for a few years now, but until recently it seemed like all it was good for was printing out fun plastic trinkets. The age of the tchotcke, however, is coming to a close for 3D printing. More and more people are recognizing it as an incredibly disruptive and empowering technology that will profoundly change the world as we know it. Utah's first 3D printer store, Zeni Kinetic, founded by Utah Valley native Nicco Macintyre, is now making this technology available to the general public.

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Authentic Learning

Authentic Learning

SLC’s new Roots Charter High School puts students on the farm.

By Katherine Pioli

A science teacher steps with her students out through the doors of their school and into a garden. Just imagine how her science lesson is transformed. Suddenly, things that were, moments before, just words in a book and diagrams on a page are happening all around them. The students can see, touch and study the life of a plant – from germination to pollination. Then, the art teacher arrives. His students find a place to sit at the edges of the garden. They take out their pencils and begin to sketch. Meanwhile, in the garden rows, other students are bending low placing seedlings gently into the earth and tamping the soil down around their roots.

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Choosing Our Battles

Choosing Our Battles

Finding options in the spaciousness of mindfulness.

By Teresa Jordan

A couple of years ago, a few months after my father's death, I attended a retreat with Byron Katie, whose work had been recommended to me by a psychologist friend as being particularly effective when dealing with both anxiety and grief. The re­treat took place in a large hotel near the Miami airport, and we began each day with a walking meditation around the lushly landscaped grounds, silently naming whatever our eyes landed upon as simply as possible: leaf, tree, curb, flower, cloud. The idea was to remain grounded entirely in the present moment, something that is harder to do than it sounds.

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Life on the Tavaputs Plateau

Life on the Tavaputs Plateau

How I fell in love with a sacrifice zone.

By Melanie J. Martin

M y handcuffs tightened with every bump and jolt as the van barreled down the 85-mile road to Vernal, Utah, the heart of oil and gas country. The workers' cries of alarm still rang in my ears. Like scared insects they'd fled from their bulldozers and belly-graders the moment we swarmed over the tar sands processing facility, clad in chipmunk masks. The sight of a truck spraying ancient aquifer water for dust control had filled me with rage. Adrenaline still flooded my veins. The police had protected the real criminals – the corporations destroying this place, home and hunting ground to indigenous people and animals.

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Catalyst Blogs

  • Feb 27, 2015
    The Aquarium Age: Feb. 25 - Mar. 3
    Written by

    The veils between dimensions grow increasingly thin this week, and as astral alignments provide greater multidimensional clarity, daily interactions take on a no-nonsense approach that is sure to unsettle even the most candid commentator. Expect you, those you love, those you barely know, and even those you'd rather not know, to be saying all sorts of things that have needed to be said, but have been held back because uttering "those things" actually requires great courage. Mars provides the nerve to say it "your way" and whether it's a dialogue or a diatribe it is likely to be delivered in a direct and succinct way that borders on military orders.

    Posted in Aquarium Age
  • Feb 21, 2015
    The Aquarium Age: Feb. 18-24
    Written by

    So Mercury went direct and Uranus took over, right? Or am I the only one who experienced several vital areas of life simply going topsy-turvy in the nanosecond it took to adjust to a hassle-free communication environment? And if your life didn't rattle or roll with a surprising plot twist or two in the last week, then you might want to be prepared for several startling developments this week, as well as the next several weeks.

    Posted in Aquarium Age
  • Feb 12, 2015
    The Aquarium Age: Feb. 11-17
    Written by

    A sing along to a Christmas favorite, Do You Hear What I Hear?

    Said the smart phone to the smart TV...
    Do you hear what I hear?
    Everything is coming back online.
    Do you hear what I hear?
    The sigh, the sigh of retrograde relief
    As Mercury finally goes direct.

    Well...isn't it a little like Christmas?

    Posted in Aquarium Age
  • Feb 06, 2015
    Sundance Film Festival 2015
    Written by

    The jury is in for the Sundance Film Festival 2015 award winners: "Me Earl and the Dying Girl" (U.S. Dramatic), "The Wolfpack" (U.S. Documentary), "Slow West" (World Dramatic), and the "The Russian Woodpecker" (World Documentary).

    But what about all the other well-crafted films that also rightfully earned a spot in the festival? Let's talk about those.

    Posted in Sophie Says

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